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Immunisation Schedules

When to Immunise - (Diseases Protected against, short name and no of injections):

Detailed information available here - What to expect and Guide to immunisations for babies up to 13 months

  • Two - Four months old
  • Twelve months to 18 years old
  • Immunisation Table
  • Recommended Ages for Immunisations

39843939 s naumovTwo months old

  • Diptheria, tetanus, Pertussis (whooping cough), Polio, and Haemophilus influenzae type b - (DTaP/IPV/Hib)    (one injection)
  • Pneumococcal disease (PCV)  (one injection)
  • Rotavirus (diarrhoea virus)  (by mouth)
  • Meningococcal group B disease (MenB)  (one injection)

Three months old

  • Diptheria, tetanus, Pertussis (Whooping Cough), Polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPVHib)    (one injection)
  • Meningitis C (MenC) (one injection)
  • Rotavirus  (by mouth)

Four months old

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPV/Hib)    (one injection)
  • Pneumococcal disease (PCV)  (one injection)
  • Meningitis B (MenB)  (one injection)

 Notes:

  • For meningitis B vaccination there is likely to be a fever of up to 39c afterwards so we advise administering paracetamol soon after the vaccination (you will be given a dose to give) and up to two more times every four to six hours.

More information about the vaccinations can be obtained from the Department of health web site here

Meningitis B - guide for parents on menigitis and septicaemia
Protecting your baby against rotavirus
Improving protection against Meningitis C
Measles - don't let your child catch it
Protecting your children against Flu

 

Photo © Dmitry Naumov

 20044317 s luiscarcellerBetween twelve and thirteen months old - within one month of the first birthday

  • Haemophilus Influenza B and Meningitis C (HiB/MenC)    (one injection)
  • Pneumococcal disease (PCV)  (one injection)
  • Measles, Mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR)    (one injection)
  • Meningitis B (MenB)  (one injection)

Two, Three and four years old and children in school years 1 and 2

  • Influenza

3 years 4 months old or soon after

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio (DTaP/IPV or dTaP/IPV)    (one injection)
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)  (one injection)

Girls aged 12 to 13 years old

  • Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma viruses type 16 and 18 (and genital warts caused by types 6 and 11) (one injection)

13-18 years old

  • Tetanus, diphtheria and polio (Td/IPV)   (one injection)

 Links to more information:
A guide for students on meningitis and septicaemia
Measles - don't let your child catch it

 

Photo © luiscarceller  

Age

Diseases protected against (short name)    (number of injections)

 
Two months  old
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio,and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPV/Hib)    (one injection)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)     (one injection)
  • Rotavirus
  • Meningococcal disease (MenB) (one injection)
 
Three months old
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPVHib)    (one injection)
  • Meningitis C (MenC)   (one injection)
  • Rotavirus
 
Four months old
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPV/Hib)    (one injection)
  • Meningitis B (MenB)   (one injection)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)  (one injection)
 
Twelve - Thirteen months old
  • Hib/Men C                                    (one injection)
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)    (one injection)
  • Pneumococcal disease (PCV)          (one injection)
  • Meningitis B (Men B)                     (one injection)
 
Two, Three & four years old and children in school years 1 & 2
  • Influenza (intranasal administration)
 
3 years 4 months old or soon after
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio (DTaP/IPV or dTaP/IPV)    (one injection)
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)                                          (one injection)
 
Girls aged 12 to 13 years
  • HPV  (one injection)
 
Around 14 years old
  • Tetanus, diphtheria and polio (Td/IPV)   (one injection)
  • Meningitis C (MenC) and Meningococcal Group W (MenW) ***

*** Please note that there is a shortage of the Men ACWY vaccine and a rolling program of vaccination is in place as follows:
We can vaccinate first all teenagers aged 17-18 years of age ( born between 1/9/1996 - 31/8/1997) they are all eligible regardless of their plans to attend university and definately before university, if they were attending. As stock is limited the rolling schedule is as follows for everyone else:. 

October 2015 : School year 9 or 10 – age 13-15 ( this will be the routine schedule) 
January 2016 : Current year 10 – will be year 11 at time of vaccine ( catch up) 
April 2016 : Current year 12 – will be year 13 at time of vaccine
April 2017: Current Year 11- Will be year 13 at time of vaccine
 

5851092 s sergeiteleginRecommended Ages for Immunisations

2  months 

First Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping Cough, Polio, HIB, First Meningitis B, First Rotavirus

3  months

Second Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping Cough, Polio, HIB, Rotavirus. First Meningitis C

4  months

Third Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping Cough, Polio, HIB, Rotavirus. Second Meningitis B

12-13 months 

First Mumps, Measles, Rubella (German Measles), Hib/MenC. Second Pneumococcal. Third Meningitis B

2 to 4 years

Influenza

3 years 4 months 

Diptheria, Tetanus, and polio, Second MMR

Girls 12-13 years

HPV

14 years

Diphtheria, Tetanus and Polio Boosters and Meningitis C and Meningitis W ***

 

Please tell the nurse if your child has a fever, takes steroids, has a serious disease, has allergies particular to eggs, has a strong reaction to any previous inoculations or has a parent or brother or sister who has suffered from epilepsy.

*** Please note that there is a shortage of the Men ACWY vaccine and a rolling program of vaccination is in place as follows:

We can vaccinate first all teenagers aged 17-18 years of age ( born between 1/9/1996 - 31/8/1997) they are all eligible regardless of their plans to attend university and definately before university, if they were attending. As stock is limited the rolling schedule is as follows for everyone else:

October 2015 : School year 9 or 10 – age 13-15 ( this will be the routine schedule)
January 2016 : Current year 10 – will be year 11 at time of vaccine ( catch up)
April 2016 : Current year 12 – will be year 13 at time of vaccine
April 2017: Current Year 11- Will be year 13 at time of vaccine

 

Image © sergeitelegin

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